Search found 2155 matches

by Ian S C
Thu May 17, 2018 2:21 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Whispergen mk4
Replies: 14
Views: 1860

Re: Whispergen mk4

Hi Saska, I can understand the lime scale on the cooling side, I imagine that can be dissolved. Don't know how the pistons could get rusty unless it has layed up with the motor open to the atmosphere.
Hope you can get at least one running, they are quite a good little motor.
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Wed May 16, 2018 2:12 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Engine running for short period
Replies: 5
Views: 966

Re: Engine running for short period

The cooling system has been one of the main problems in using Stirling Engines in motor vehicles. As for the piston, you might be able to modify it to reduce friction. If you can remove the piston and support it in the lathe so that you can put a number of grooves, about .010" in width and depth on ...
by Ian S C
Mon May 14, 2018 4:26 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Engine running for short period
Replies: 5
Views: 966

Re: Engine running for short period

One of your problems may be that your power cylinder and piston are like metals, generally this is not good practice, you should make the power piston from cast iron. As metals go the only one that can be run together is cast iron, second best is cast iron and steel. What do you do with the water in...
by Ian S C
Sat May 12, 2018 2:18 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Yorky's Twin Cylinder Beam Engine
Replies: 14
Views: 1784

Re: Yorky's Twin Cylinder Beam Engine

A ha, Yorky, you missed the free piston bit, these motors have no crankshaft, the work from the power piston works against a spring, this can be a mechanical spring, or a gas spring, or as in this case using two magnets with like poles facing each other, at the base of the motor you can see the coil...
by Ian S C
Fri May 11, 2018 4:02 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Yorky's Twin Cylinder Beam Engine
Replies: 14
Views: 1784

Re: Yorky's Twin Cylinder Beam Engine

The ideal metal for the hot cap is stainless steel, heat conduction is no problem, it's only got to go the few thou, the thickness of the cap, the thing you don't need is the conduction of heat length wise toward the cold end. With a steel/stainless steel hot cap I use no insulation between the hot ...
by Ian S C
Thu May 10, 2018 2:35 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Yorky's Twin Cylinder Beam Engine
Replies: 14
Views: 1784

Re: Yorky's Twin Cylinder Beam Engine

Yorky, interesting form of construction, I'll follow along as you build your motor. Copper is not really the ideal material, it conducts hear too fast from the hot end to the cold end. Also when heated it looses it's strength, also with heating it corrodes and flakes of copper oxide come off it, bot...
by Ian S C
Thu May 10, 2018 2:20 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Connecting Rod of a Gamma-configuration Sterling Engine
Replies: 1
Views: 615

Re: Connecting Rod of a Gamma-configuration Sterling Engine

Don't know, I would have to see the motor, but a guess would be that it is a tin can motor, and the displacer is vertical, gravity takes the displacer down and the crank lifts it up, so it only has to be able to take tension. The power piston has to push against the crank, so it must be ridged. Ian ...
by Ian S C
Mon May 07, 2018 4:05 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: "Hi...We are new here!" First posts here (or anywhere is OK)
Replies: 428
Views: 119840

Re: "Hi...We are new here!" First posts here (or anywhere is OK)

Yorky, go for it, at least I will follow along. Oh and welcome to the forum.
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Sun Apr 29, 2018 3:08 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: A Stirling theory question on average pressures
Replies: 5
Views: 1073

Re: A Stirling theory question on average pressures

I tried a snifter valve on a couple of my engines, but found there was little if any power gain, so I gave up. Some people have found quite a bit of power gain, maybe my machining is too sloppy.
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:03 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Philips MP 1002 CA
Replies: 11
Views: 1673

Re: Philips MP 1002 CA

If you can't get the magnets up. new magnets from steel or cast iron incorporating some rare earth magnets is a possibility, but you have a good chance, I have a remagnetiser, and rejuvenate magnets for old automotive magnetos.
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Thu Apr 26, 2018 2:27 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Philips MP 1002 CA
Replies: 11
Views: 1673

Re: Philips MP 1002 CA

The square one with two 20uf capacitors in parallel would be the same as one at 40uf.
Inside the flywheel there is a centrifugal brake that governs the speed to 3000rpm, seems a bit crude to me, but I suppose it works.
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Wed Apr 25, 2018 1:49 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Philips MP 1002 CA
Replies: 11
Views: 1673

Re: Philips MP 1002 CA

It is an AC unit. I doubt that it is a diode(the round disc), does it have any writing on it?
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Sun Apr 22, 2018 4:36 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Stirling power generator
Replies: 14
Views: 1850

Re: Stirling power generator

The bore of the power cylinder should be cast iron, the hot cap should be stainless steel.
Ian S C
by Ian S C
Sun Apr 22, 2018 4:28 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Philips MP 1002 CA
Replies: 11
Views: 1673

Re: Philips MP 1002 CA

Rik, the round one at the bottom should be 20 Mfd wired across the coils, and the big square one is actually two 20 Mfd in parallel in series with the load. Run capacitors for an electric motor would be the ones for replacement. The old ones are probably due for replacement. Look for a rating of 300...
by Ian S C
Fri Apr 20, 2018 5:02 am
Forum: Stirling and "Hot Air" Engine Forum
Topic: Stirling power generator
Replies: 14
Views: 1850

Re: Stirling power generator

If you plan to burn 12L / hr I would expect a lot more than 3W(maybe 10s of Kw's ), the Philips motor ran for 8 hrs on a 3.3L tank, or about .4L per hr. Power regulation can be done by varying the pressure in the motor, but the best way is to have a constant load, the motor and load designed to matc...