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Re: Tesla's Heat Engine

Posted: Wed Aug 17, 2016 11:24 pm
by Tom Booth
I'm going to be doing my best to put together a heat engine based on the principles Tesla described in his article, though probably not a replica since as far as I know, nobody knows what Tesla's engine might have looked like and it is debatable if any kind of prototype ever existed. Regardless I'm going to try to put something together. I think I have a pretty good idea how to go about it. Maybe it will even work, who knows, but anyway my resources are quite limited so if anyone would like to help out I have a gofundme page. Anything contributed will of course be used strictly for this project. I will also be making progress reports and posting updates there if anyone wishes to follow along. Feel free to send me a Facebook friend request as I've been posting stuff there as well.



https://www.facebook.com/tom.booth.31508

Re: Tesla's Heat Engine

Posted: Tue Aug 23, 2016 12:03 am
by aliisajoseph
Any kind of energetic imbalance can be harnessed and transformed to power a mechanical or electrical system. This includes temperature imbalance. The example of Peltier modules makes this clear, as does the Sterling engine. The former converts difference in temp to potential difference; the latter to mechanical energy. Tesla's words to this effect seem far from outlandish. In fact, they sound like good common sense. R Programming Training | DataStage Training | SQL Training | SAS Training | Android Training | SharePoint Training

The question becomes even more intriguing when we look at Viktor Schauberger's work with vortexes and their exothermic properties. Hmmm. Maybe there's more to Tesla's words here than sheer musing.

Onward, I dare say, into the throng of discussion!!

Re: Tesla's Heat Engine

Posted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 6:19 pm
by Tom Booth
Looks like a variation on the "Icy Ball" ammonia absorption refrigerator.


Wellington wrote:
Tom Booth wrote:As some here may be aware I've previously posted about the possibility of a heat engine running on ambient heat. Tesla worked on building such an engine........ .

Take a look at Robert murray smiths video on youtube about a solid state stirling engine. might be of interest to you.


regards

Wellington

Re: Tesla's Heat Engine

Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2016 4:10 am
by MikeB
Sounds to me like you are talking about a variation on what is currently known as an "Air Source Heat Pump"
I can't say I understand it well enough though, to do the maths to check whether it is theoretically possible or not.

Re: Tesla's Heat Engine

Posted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 2:57 pm
by Tom Booth
MikeB wrote:Sounds to me like you are talking about a variation on what is currently known as an "Air Source Heat Pump"
I can't say I understand it well enough though, to do the maths to check whether it is theoretically possible or not.
Well..

I think "air source" just refers to where the heat is being taken from, as opposed to "ground source" i.e. geothermal. otherwise just a heat pump.

I believe Tesla intended using the air itself as a "refrigerant". Which is actually quite possible but generally impractical and inefficient for conventional refrigeration. Inefficient, not because it doesn't work well but because it works TOO WELL producing such extreem cold it is mostly only practical for cryogenics. For domestic refrigeration it is necessary to add heat back to the cold produced by an air-cycle which just wastes a lot of energy.

For producing a temperature differential for a heat engine however... where both the heat produced and the cold can be utilized, the possibilities are intriguing.

Re: Tesla's Heat Engine

Posted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 3:09 pm
by Tom Booth
This pdf describes air-cycle refrigeration.

http://www.grimsby.ac.uk/documents/frpe ... search.pdf